As many of you know, tinnitus can come in many forms. A person may experience hissing, buzzing, ringing or generally strange noises in their ears for no apparent reason. Sometimes the tinnitus can be so bad that a person is bed ridden and unable to perform their normal functions like going to work or taking care of their children. Other people find that the tinnitus wakes them up in the middle of the night and they are unable to get back to sleep. In our society, most people are already sleep deprived, so this is a serious threat to their general health.

It is generally recognized that tinnitus can be caused by several factors. One of the first correlations to tinnitus is actually in your neck. That’s right, when C-2 in your neck is out of place, this can often lead to the symptoms of tinnitus. As a TMD practitioner, I am well aware that when C-2 is out of place, this often will lead to displacement of the discs in the jaw joints as well, so perhaps the displacement of C-2 causes disc displacement in the jaw joints, which in turn puts inadvertent pressure on the ear. This might be how it all occurs, but there is no conclusive proof at this time.

The most logical cause of tinnitus, and the one factor that I have seen to be consistent over the years is that when the articular discs in the jaw joints are displaced, quite often this causes pressure on the ear canal and I believe is one of the leading causes of tinnitus. The reason I believe this to be true is that when the displaced jaw joint discs are treated, oftentimes the tinnitus goes away. If you check out the diagram below, you can see that the normal positioning of the articular discs should be just above the top of the jaw bone. Then, when that disc is slipped forward, or anteriorly, it will have the effect of pushing that jaw bone (condyle) much harder toward the ear canal. And since most of the time a disc is displaced anteriorly, I believe this is what puts the pressure on the ear canal and causes the tinnitus. And since I see tinnitus abating over the course of TMD treatment, there seems to be a strong correlation to slipped discs in my opinion. Sure, there could be other factors involved like damage to the ear itself from trauma, but most every time that I order an MRI after trauma and self-reporting of tinnitus, I see anteriorly displaced articular discs.

Normal Jaw Join Placement v Anterio Disc Displacement

So when someone reports tinnitus as a problem, it would probably be logical to check for displaced articular discs in the TM joints. It’s a great place to start.

In the sketch below, it can clearly be seen how many nerves are within and around the jaw joint. So if the jaw is pushed aside by a displaced articular disc, this can cause pain in the nerves and can disturb the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, such problems are often overlooked by many practitioners. They are more often trained to treat the symptoms rather than delve deeper into the structural problem itself. With all the nerves that traverse through skull, it is important that the structure of the skull be examined carefully and the practitioner needs to look for any imbalances and displacements that might cause pain/tinnitus/twitching/etc.

TMJ Auriculotemporal Nerve diagram